Home » Friday Fictioneers » Head High, Walk On – Friday Fictioneers

Head High, Walk On – Friday Fictioneers

Good Wednesday evening, my peeps.  It’s been a helluva beginning to my week and this is my first chance at writing my story for Friday Fictioneers, hosted, as always, by the wonderful Rochelle Wisoff-Fields – the mistress of the short story.  This week she chose this cool photo from Jean L. Hayes.  You may use this photo only if you are participating in this challenge.  Otherwise, not cool.  To join in the fun, just write your story in 100 words or less, not including the title, and add your link by clicking on Monsieur Frog below the pic.  It’s fun and addictive.

Copyright ©Jean L. Hayes

Get ze link

Head High, Walk On

She waltzed through life exuding confidence.  Her smile was often referred to as a welcoming beacon.  The day she was called in and told that she was “too familiar” with the clients and that two of them had complained about her, that confidence was shaken.

What the hell does that mean?  How did she go from being a “favourite” to many, to being “too familiar”?

While at first she was stunned, as the day went on, hurt and dismay set in.

By evening, she chose to hold her head high and walk on.  She would not change who she was.

 

115 thoughts on “Head High, Walk On – Friday Fictioneers

  1. Dear Dale,

    This story has a ring of utter truth to it. She does well to hold her head high for she has nothing to be ashamed of. Her smile is a welcoming beacon and I believe I’ve basked in the warmth of it. Well told, my friend. ❤

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    PS "Get ze link?" Hahahahahahahahahaha!!!!

  2. Q,

    I do believe that certain people are tests. We leave school behind and think the tests are over and done with, but really . . some of the most important ones are still happening. And people, they have a way of tossing BS at us . . sometimes justlikethat! . . .

    And these tests are more personal. So it’s a good thing we come prepared and know how to deal with this kind of BS. And so you can simply smile and say “To hell with y’all for switching things up . . .”. Because you are better than that.

    Peace and being the better person

  3. This rings a bell with me………. I was told off by my manager that I was too familiar with some customers by calling them by their first names as they did me. I’d been with another bank almost 6 years beforehand and some of these customers had been mine there too. Also, I had known some of them for over 15 years, so I said it would seem odd if I changed my address of them. All cashiers then had new name plates, dropping the Mr/Mrs/Miss initials and surname, being replaced by their Christian names and surnames. Whether that was anything to do with me, I never found out.
    Your character had nothing to be ashamed of, so should quite rightly be confident and hold her head up. Sometimes our bosses are asses…………..

    • It’s ridiculous. We have to Mister and Madam everyone. Learning their names (there are over a thousand members) requires effort and willingness. It’s funny how some try to get you to use their Christian names (not allowed) and find the rules ridiculous,, while others want utter formality.
      Sometimes the bosses are just relaying the message they received from their bosses – as a private club, that means all the members.
      Her personality will always shine through and she won’t change – but she might change other things….

  4. Another short tale so true to life. And yes, when the people around you turn contrary, a head held high is the best resolution. Hell, it’s the best solution in nigh all situations.

  5. Life can beat us down – so it takes extreme confidence to stand tall! Bottom line – I like your story, which is also a reminder for us not to beat down others so much.

  6. Good short take on LIFE and handling criticism. I like the comments, too. Sometimes we are tested, a bit of “sandpaper” applied to smooth us out some. Sometimes we do have to modify if someone tells us we’re a bit extreme for this setting. Good for her if she’s recovered her balance and can go on with her dignity intact. 🙂

    • Thank you, Christine. Love that “sandpaprer” reference. We learn to adapt to our situations. What works in one doesn’t always work in another…

  7. I find that life is too short to take every thing personally. I liked the ending, to me it says; just ride through the storm, it will blow over and normality will prevail. – Usually, since other peoples opinions are just that, biased opinions.

    • It so is, James. I love that one usually gets stronger after getting through the storm. And Anthony Hopkins said it: “What you think of me is none of my business.” Makes it that much easier to dismiss it.

  8. Don’t let one person’s comments or opinions change the way you feel about yourself! I have gone through that often…knowing that I can wake up everyday, hold my head high as you have written, and be the person that I choose to be, it gives me strength. It takes guts to withstand criticism but in the end it’s you that has to be happy with you..Big thumbs up my friend 🙂

    • I guess when it comes out of the blue… here you are, great mood, starting your day and bam! Outta left field. Takes the wind out of your sails for a bit. Being me, it’s all I can and want to be. Moving forward…

  9. Great illustration of how you shouldn’t let the peons get you down! I can feel your (er, her) frustration with the mixed messages, too, You can make most of the people happy, but they never say anything, and then the two people who happen not to like whatever flavor you are, they’re the ones who complain and that’s what gets listened to. Not fair, but not unusual either, sad to say: squeaky wheel, and all.

  10. Maybe her boss has a point. In professions where emotions are involved too much chummy can start trouble. Assuming she can afford to take a chance on leaving, though , I’m quite happy for her

    • She might. It’s in the service industry in a private golf club. Some members are there 4-6 days per week. Of course they get to know each other. Members want you to remember them… but some are more friendly than others.

  11. Funny to hear all this discussion on rules of formality. It seems like everyone is on a first name basis where i live.

    When you first said “familiar” i thought this might be a euphemism for sexual harassment or some such faux pas, of which the main character seems to be utterly dismissive, perhaps to her detriment?

    Am i Reading too much into it?

  12. good for her. as shakespear wrote, “to thine own self be true. and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then balse to any man.”

  13. I like your first two lines. Especially, “Her smile was often referred to as a welcoming beacon.” Good for her keeping her head held high. There needs to be more friendly people with smiles like a welcoming beacon! 🙂

  14. Sounds like some professional jealousy in play here. She is a brave and wise girl to hold her head up and keep her self-belief. Sometimes all is not what it seems and the fact she got that criticism could be more to do with the people giving it than the person getting it.

  15. I congratulate ‘her’ on the confidence to keep her head high, that’s not easy at all. The complainers are either a bit dense and completely misunderstood some comment meant to be friendly (that happened to me once) or they are jealous of their ‘status’ and want the haughty to be the rule.

    • Thank you for ‘her’…
      Or… it could be jealous wives who think she is too nice to their husbands, even though she is just as nice to them….

  16. It’s such a fine line, and it varies by person. Better to be open than closed, even if someone perceives the line was crossed, so good for “her” for holding her head high!

  17. I like where you went with the photo. It is hard to go from favourite to over-familiar. She was right to move on and find somewhere else where her talents would be valued. Although I’d still be wanting to know when the ‘change’ happened and why.

  18. I think confidence can be looked upon as a negative trait far too often, particularly in women, though goodness knows why. I loved that your character didn’t give in and refused to change herself, despite being so hurt. Great story!

  19. There are people out there who will complain about anything and anyone, no matter how pleasant and positive. People love to tear stuff down, that’s the truth. I’m glad she’s walking, taking her own path. Most will love her for it. 🙂

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