Home » Friday Fictioneers » From Outrage To Opera – Friday Fictioneers

From Outrage To Opera – Friday Fictioneers

Good Wednesday evening, my readers! It is Friday Fictioneers time and I (foolishly?) decided to try and channel our very own Queen-of-bringing-history-to-life, Rochelle. What was I thinking? Thank you to GAH Lerner for the use of her lovely photo.

Please, do join in and give us your 100-word story that came to you upon gazing at this photograph. Once you have written it, click on the blue frog below and add your link… then the best part is this: You read and comment on other’s stories, they read and comment on yours and our community becomes even more wonderful. And, bonus, you don’t even realise it, but your writing becomes all the better for it! Win-Win!

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From Outrage To Opera

Moon gazing, Ryan thought of his journey. He saw his 12-year-old self, sitting in solitary confinement despite two good years with Miss Hughes, a teacher who never gave up on him, telling him he mattered.

Once out, he vowed to change his circumstances, including signing up for choir despite his lack of singing skills. Mr. Brown, teacher, took it upon himself to teach him, bringing him to the Metropolitan Opera at 15, with Denyce Graves, an African-American lead singer. Someone like him. Finally, Ryan had a dream.

Nine years later, Ryan Speedo Green sang at that very same Metropolitan Opera.

***********

Read more about Ryan here

118 thoughts on “From Outrage To Opera – Friday Fictioneers

  1. Q,
    I remember reading about this dude, it’s a wonderful and inspiring story. And you tucked it beautifully into the 100!

    To the true believers who make the world a better place

  2. What a great story and your clever portrait brought it so well alive. I love stories like this; not giving up, the dedication and ‘love’ of one or two person(s) who give one’s life a beautiful direction. πŸ™‚

  3. Treading on Rochelle’s territory here πŸ˜‰ Nicely done. It is a great story. Good teachers like Elizabeth Hughes and Robert Brown can make such a huge difference!

  4. Dear Dale,

    As others have said to me, you’ve introduced me to someone I didn’t know about. Thank you. You did a wonderful job of making me care about him. Oh those teachers who make a difference in our lives. What would we do without them? Good job, my friend.

    Shalom and hugs,

    Rochelle

    • Dear Rochelle,

      Yay! It’s funny because I was picturing someone looking up at the moon thinking back and I don’t know why I wanted it to be an opera signer… so I googled rags to riches opera! So very glad I succeeded in doing what you do best πŸ˜‰

      Lotsa love,

      Dale

  5. Dear Dale,

    I followed the link and read the inspiring story. It seems you are following in the footsteps of our den mother/bus driver–and doing an excellent job too. This story proves that while we might not be able to change the world, we CAN change one person’s world.

    • Dear Russell,

      I canna lie. I was definitely trying to follow our purple leader’s lead… and do thank you that you think I succeeded.
      We definitely can change one person’s world if we choose to.

  6. Change doesn’t always come from big bang occasions. Sometimes it takes just the one who cares to mentor/aide. Nicely done, Dale. Now, what is this about The Painted Lady? Googled it, but not sure what you and the first commenter were floating around.

    • Indeed… it just takes one who cares.
      Ahhh… I did a prompt challenge a ways back using the words Painted Lady (amongst other words) and Frank joined in by adding his mini story to one of our (participants) comments… It’s an on-going thing πŸ˜‰

  7. I’ve never heard of him. It’s a good thing he got someone who was willing to give him a chance. Of course, if you tell a kid he can’t sing, there’s always a chance that he~as I ~really can’t

  8. I had a wonderful Biology teacher one for my A levels, got me really interested in anthropology, problem was he taught the wrong syllabus and I ended up not being an anthropologist, drawing squares on a map isn’t a bad substitute I guess!
    Lovely stuff Dale as ever.

  9. Lovely story Dale. Everyone needs mentors in guides in life, especially when so many things are working against us. Thank you for sharing Ryan’s story with us. Its truly inspiring.

    Susan

  10. I love it. You’ve written a little true-life gem of a story, just like Rochelle does. It was so interesting and inspirational reading about Ryan, and I’m so glad he had some people who believed in him. It makes me sad that there might be other talented people out there who could follow a dream/ aspire to greatness if only somebody showed them how. It is such a game of chance who our teachers are. Thanks, Dale, for this πŸ™‚

    • Thank you, Sarah. So very happy you appreciate (And opera to boot! πŸ˜‰)
      There must be scads out there would woulda coulda if only someone had seen them…
      Thank you for your great comment.

  11. Teachers make a big diffrence in a childs life when they show they care.
    Teachers turn out to be 2nd parents when a child is not being nurtures.
    Loving tale you’ve painted of this childs transition. Nice research on your character too.
    Izzy 😎

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