Home » Crimson's Creative Challenge » Which Lady? – Crimson’s Creative Challenge #21

Which Lady? – Crimson’s Creative Challenge #21

I knew exactly where I wanted to go with Crispina’s latest challenge.  I did a little reserarch to make sure I didn’t make a total fool of myself.   This challenge is fun because the rules are fast and loose.  Only thing that is asked is to keep it 150 words or less.  Wasn’t feeling poetic this week so did a little discussion between two girls.

To play along, just click here, you’ll see pretty much anything goes!

 

Which Lady?

“Oh, this place is perfect!  The Lady in the Water must reside here!”

“Don’t be daft.  She came from a swimming pool.”

“Bother!  Oh, I know!  The Lady of Shallot, then.  How romantic.  Maybe we’ll see her—”

“What is wrong with you?  She floated down a river.  Does this look like a river to you?”

“I’ve got it. The Lady of the Lake. You cannot dispute that this could, despite its tiny size, pass for a lake.”

“Hah! Which one?  Which Lady of the Lake?”

“Which one?  There is more than one?”

“Yep.  There is Viviane, Lancelot’s protector, who presented him with Excalibur.  And there is the lady Ellen from Walter Scott’s poem who is the centre of attention in a feud between King James V and the powerful clan Douglas—”

“OK, OK. Smarty-pants.  You’re no fun, you know that?  I just wanted to play a simple game of make-believe.”

 

88 thoughts on “Which Lady? – Crimson’s Creative Challenge #21

  1. When I saw the title of this post … Which Lady … and then saw the picture, I couldn’t help thinking of the Lady of the Lake and the description from Monty Python’s The Holy Grail: ” Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some farcical aquatic ceremony.”

    I can’t improve on that so I won’t even try.

    Liked by 2 people

      • Oh my gosh! You forgot something from the most important movie ever made? I just don’t know if I even know you anymore. I mean …

        “You can’t expect to wield supreme executive power just ’cause some watery tart threw a sword at you!”

        Liked by 1 person

          • Oddly, it is a guy thing. I accept that it isn’t for everybody to watch this movie repetitively and will think no less of you for the idea that you actually found better things to do with your time than watch it over and over again.

            Liked by 1 person

          • There are a few. Fried Green Tomatoes (Yeah, I know, chick flick), A Knight’s Tale – I never get tired of it…why? I just can’t say…a coupla other chick flicks…

            Like

          • Sigh … A Knight’s Tale is one of those movies that whenever the wife finds it on TV, she has to watch it. She’s got at least one of our sons addicted to the stupid thing as well. Again … sigh.

            But I shall not judge … we all need our own ways to escape.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Yeah. I know. It’s silly but it’s fun. Sigh away.
            But there are other movies. Lots. That I’ll sit through time and again.
            What’s yours unless it is The Holy Grail? And I’ll try not to judge myself…😉

            Liked by 1 person

          • The one that pops up first in my head is the Batman movie with Heath Ledger as the Joker. I’d also watch Reign Over Me over and over again if given the opportunity. Into the Wild hits me in the solar plexus and is a movie I need to watch more than I do.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Heath – oh look! Both our movies have him! 😎😉
            I’ll have to check the other two. Into the Wild was one that I wanted and didn’t want to see…

            Liked by 1 person

          • Yes… two completely different sides of Heath Ledger. I don’t think there will ever be a performance I see that tops his turn as The Joker. Reign Over Me is not an easy movie to watch. Nor is Into the Wild. I can totally understand not wanting to watch either one, but particularly with Into the Wild … it’s a true story that is just so incredible and speaks to a piece of me that I’ve never let out.

            Liked by 1 person

          • You can’t help but fall in love with the story and his dream and who he was, which makes the end so incredibly difficult. It’s a punch to the gut. I watched it again with my younger son a few months ago and we agreed on how hard the ending is.

            Liked by 1 person

          • That’s too bad. Our younger son, who is 21, will still watch anything and do anything with me if I ask him. My older son, who is 24, not so much. Part of the problem is that he and I have completely different schedules. Part of the problem is that we’re figuring out if we actually like each other enough to want to spend time together. 😉

            Liked by 1 person

          • My eldest, who is 21 can’t be bothered with anything to do with things we did as a family before his father died. I try but nope. Would rather lock himself in his room and watch YouTube videos on all sorts of subjects. The youngest, 19, will occasionally watch a snippet or even accompany me to the store. But that’s it.
            Rather lonely, now that we mention it. Good thing I go out and do stuff!

            Liked by 1 person

          • That’s all got to be really hard on all of you, but getting out and doing stuff is what you gotta do. I’m committed to not letting the limitations of my family members put limits on the things I want to do. As a result, I end up doing a lot of things by myself or with others.

            And so … we went from the Lady of the Lake to watery tarts, to Heath Ledger and Into the Wild to family dynamics. ;).

            Liked by 1 person

          • It has its moments! I’m just glad they’re old enough for me to keep on living life without having to worry about them. They can fend for themselves!

            What a crazy ride this has been! Gotta love the blogging world for giving us the opportunity to go with the slow! 🙃🙂

            Liked by 1 person

  2. Bella notte, no. Bella giornata, si. Piccolo, sì. Ma un oceano di una storia a prescindere.

    Little birds chirpings be side an enchated pool, one the antagonist, one the protagonist. But there are no villains or heroes here.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Q,

    I can’t believe I saw Lady in the Water. In the theater no less. I have no blessed idea what I was thinking, and I still don’t. Other than the whole M. Night crush that I had going strong at the time, and which has been rekindled with his latest works.

    Truth be told, I wouldn’t be able to tell the difference between Lady of the Lake or Water. My knowledge of the classics is nil.

    Well done reflection (had to) on the artistic differences between reality and art.

    B

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Love your tale. Impressed you slipped those names in so slick.
    But you did miss one: Mesuline, legendary ancestress of the Counts of Anjou, and thus of the Plantagenets, and therefore of the kings of England. She took mermaid form.
    But that’s no criticism, since these days few people know that legend. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Dear Dale,

    There are some people you can count on to ‘cheapen the moment’. I got lost amongst the Ladies. 😉 And when it comes to Loreena McKennitt you’ve found a captive audience. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Rodhelle,

      There are those who just can’t seem to help but lord it over others (gah! I hope I’m never like that!)
      So glad you enjoyed Loreena. Love her! 😊

      Shalom and lots love,

      Dale

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I love that Lorena McKennett version of Lady of Shallot. It may have inspired a few poems 🙂 –and I think of Anne of Green Gables, too.
    Your comments above made me think of Spamalot–Sara Ramirez as the Lady of Lake.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Nice job Dale. I could picture two young girls just being girls and gabbing by the pond. And then you posted the link with the video and Loreena McKennett singing. I had no intention of listening and watching this for 12 minutes. But it was so engaging and beautiful, I could not stop. Shame on you. Lol. Lovely piece.

    Liked by 1 person

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