Home » Crimson's Creative Challenge » A Family Represented – Crimson’s Creative Challenge #29

A Family Represented – Crimson’s Creative Challenge #29

I know, I know. I should NOT be hanging out in front of my computer. I have boxes to schlep!  However, I took a look-see at this photo and knew exactly what I wanted to write.  Plus, it’s good to take breaks, right? Thank you, Crispina, for taking me away from my “duties” for a few minutes! And how cool that the challenge number 29 was issued on May 29.  Coinkidink?  Mayhaps…

A Family Represented

Marie returned, once again, to her family’s window ledge in their church. She placed the fifth candle, to the right, lining it up with the other four, and allowed her tears to fall. She could not believe she was back here again so soon. Within less than six years, she had lost her whole family.

First Mom with meningitis.

Within two years, her brothers Steve, Paul and Rick. Each of them hemophiliacs. Each of them recipients of blood transfusions over the years. Tainted blood. Before testing was as rigorous as it is today.

Her father grew ever more despondent. His broken heart couldn’t take it anymore and it stopped working.

He couldn’t stay, not even for Marie.

 

Word count: 120

 

Based on a true story – an ugly bit of history.  I know it didn’t only happen in Canada.  More here.

69 thoughts on “A Family Represented – Crimson’s Creative Challenge #29

  1. How very very VERY sad.
    I’m so sorry it was based on a true story, though yes, we know there were too many stories of whole families wiped out by all manner of illnesses — preventable and not.

    Good for you for taking some time out of packing and moving and the other craziness of new-house’ing — we get the bonus of it through your posts!
    Hugs and I’m cheering you on!
    Na’ama

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Well done. Read the article — and finally, what can you say? Lessons have always been learned, and every improvement instigated, from the loss of lives. Small comfort to the sufferers, though. Hindsight being 20/20, the Red Cross knows now that they should have taken the issue seriously.

    I wonder what the survival rate is for hemophiliacs who never receive transfusions? Is this a case of the cure being more fatal than the disease?

    Liked by 1 person

      • I guess a person would. Even someone like myself, if in an accident and needing blood.

        I know people who consider it part of their civic duty to donate blood when there’s a blood-donor clinic being held, and I did once, too. It’s a shame to think we must import blood more likely to be tainted. But it’s getting to the point now where the Red Cross is hard-put to find people not on meds or dealing with some illness.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I have donated blood a number of times. Unfortunately, so did many before they knew of AIDS and other issues. What a tragic story. Innocent hemophiliacs paying the price of other, not so innocent donors. Good, tragic, story.

    Liked by 1 person

    • And yet, many of the donors were innocent – they didn’t know they were tainted at that point. Red Cross and other such institutions found themselves in an awful place that had to drastically change

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Q,

    It seems like something that would have occurred back in medieval times, until you realize that it happened in the here and now. Which is not only completely sobering, the idea of losing your family to this, but it’s downright frightening. What with all the progress we supposedly have made.

    This one packed a gut punch. Well done.

    B

    Liked by 1 person

    • B,

      It would seem like that. And when I googled it, trying to remember their names (not that I would have used them), I was shocked at how many there were. Another woman lost her four brothers and there were many more. Hemophilia tends to happen more to boys than girls, for some strange reason. A good girlfriend of mine lived in fear for years after this because she had had innumerable blood transfusions during that time.

      I thank you.

      Q

      Liked by 1 person

        • Until you know someone who knows someone… as in my case – my sister’s friend was the second brother to die. She went to all the funerals. At the last son’s, the father looked at Tracy and said: You know, I’m tired of seeing you at these things. Never imagining his would be the next one she would attend.

          Lynne still worries now and again though she is, for all intents and purposes, safe.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Violet. I was shocked to see how many families were decimated by the tainted blood scandal. Thankfully they figured it out and fixed the situation..
      Glad you liked!

      Like

    • Such a senseless way to go when you look at today’s standards. So very sorry for her. This is what happened to the three boys. They all contracted AIDS

      Like

    • Dear Rochelle,

      It is so sad. And I was flabbergasted to find out there were many families similarly afflicted. I thank you so very much.

      Shalom and Lotsa love,

      Dale

      Liked by 1 person

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