Home » Friday Fictioneers » The Wait – Friday Fictioneers

The Wait – Friday Fictioneers

Would you look at that? It’s Wednesday-Friday again!  I am honoured that Rochelle chose my picture for this week’s prompt.  Should you be inspired to write a little 100-word story with a beginning, middle and end, please do so. And click on the frog below to add your link.  Or, just go take a look-see at other stories…

   Click me, please

The Wait

The snow hadn’t stopped all day.  They’d be lucky if half their reservations showed up.  While she wouldn’t have minded being told to stay home, she looked forward to a quieter shift – one in which she could take the time with each customer.  When the place was full, there was the incessant buzzing of multiple conversations, interspersed with loud hoots and laughter from those who acted like they were in their own living rooms.  The clink of glassware, the clatter of cutlery against porcelain just added to the cacophony.

Some thrived on this energy.  She, just realised, no longer did.

224 thoughts on “The Wait – Friday Fictioneers

  1. It takes a lot of energy to do her job – sometimes it just cannot be summoned up. You have written such a great description, Dale, of a busy buzzing hive of a place where a “worker bee” is frustrated by not being able to give the attention she would like, and is therefore reflecting on her future.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Dear Dale,

    I raise my glass in a toast to better things on the horizon. I understand. I used to enjoy crowds…hate them now. I love this up close and personal story to go with your stellar photo.

    Shalom and lotsa placid hugs,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Rochelle,

      I raise mine to yours L’Chaim! There is a side of it that I do enjoy, the interaction with the patrons but the whole other? Not so much. Glad you enjoyed!

      Shalom and lotsa peaceful love,

      Dale

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Ah, you take me back to my bar-tendering days. Always happy to whizz around on a busy shift, but equally happy to spend time with the customers when trade was quieter. I guess if I did it now, I would prefer it quite 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Yep, I’m glad I have a job where I get to mostly sit in solitude and don’t have to deal with people! Although even I am getting a bit bored of the empty building I work in at the moment, can’t wait for some colleagues to come back from lockdown! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah. I kinda wish I had a job where I could keep working, even if from home. Mind you, seeding just my kids’ faces is getting old 😉
      Good thing I see others during my walks/runs….

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Apart from the lovely photo and your charming story (depicting so well how you felt about it, and rightly so…. – there had to be an end to it!), I was struck by your sentence: ….. hoots and laughter as if they were in their own living rooms! I have (sadly? NO, I’m by nature a joyful, often a bit loud person) never ever thought to be quiet in a restaurant. IF I am in good company, I feel free to show my joy and exuberance – and I’d bloody hate it if I felt that the staff and owners did think we had to treat their place like a morgue or a temple. and now, that we speak of that, we WERE in one of those places, nearby Monet’s Garden in Giverny where not only did we pay an absolute fortune for a very nice and very tiny lunch but although there were no more than maybe 8 tables out of some 20 used, we were the only couple who had the occasional loud laugh at something. WE had a great time, nobody was drunk, but it lacked warmth, charm and the stellar service of the delicious little portions couldn’t warm our hearts. Something to think about – or not, as we decided not ever to return there and get more for our buck somewhere maybe less exclusive but warmer in reception and service. And I’m WAHAAAAY over 100 words, as usual!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. The only loud noise in a restaurant that really bothers me is someone talking on a cell phone as if he were in a private place. Oh, and a screaming child whose parents apparently are used to it and ignore it.

    Good-natured laughter? Wonderful. But I understand your sense of it being time to consider your next option. I did that. I retired in August last year, and do not regret it for a moment. Anyway, I was already sheltering in place when we were told to be safer at home 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh yes. Even in a mall or on the street someone who talks on their phone for all to hear drives me nuts. Uncontrollable kids is a pet peeve of mine.

      Yes. Good-natured laughter is lovely. I have been home since March 13th and you know what? If I could stay home forever (but be allowed to travel around) I would!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. They say “You don’t know what you’ve got til it’s gone.” But for a lot of people now, they never knew what they could have until suddenly they lose what they did have. Now they have peace & quiet; clean air, etc. Methinks others, like yourself, won’t want to go back to the way things were.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. You described the environment perfectly. When I was a server in college some nights I just wanted to scream, “Shut up,” to enjoy that brief moment of silence just before the brief moment of employment was over.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Oh, I can relate. Back in the day I used to work part time as a waiter for a banquet house. Lots of weddings and parties. After a while the noise and behavior of people got to me. I did it for a few years but when I was done, I never looked back.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I LOATHE working banquets. At the golf club if I had the option to work the restaurant or the banquet, I always chose the restaurant. Last year was the best as I was working the bar… Then I didn’t mind helping out during service but if I could avoid it…

      Liked by 1 person

      • People lose all sense of common sense and manners with a few drinks and the ability to “perform” for others. If it weren’t for the people I worked with it would have been awful. I did it part time but even then it was 2-3 weddings a week.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Q,

    It’s one of those things, that when a person knows it’s time to move away from something that used to roust them, then it’s time. The waiting, as Tom Petty once opined, truly is the hardest part. The knowing is easy.

    One hundred words, based on a true story.

    To next chapters.

    B

    Liked by 2 people

  11. I am one of those very quiet people. No matter where I go, restaurant, sporting event, concert, my mom’s house, I am always next to the loudest possible people. I can relate to your protagonist.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I wouldn’t be able to take it. I have a hard enough time being in a loud restaurant, let alone working and keeping a happy face. Well, I hope “she” does find another option that appeals to her energy instead of drains it…

    Liked by 1 person

  13. A good friend of mine, who works in the restaurant industry and has probably held every position other than owner (though she’d done the work of some, for sure) at some point, and still manages to juggle many hats to feed home-staying New York, would probably nod at every word and agree, viscerally.
    I don’t think she thrives on that energy anymore, either. It is what it is, but there’s no craving for it.
    I’m sending this to her. … 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • There is a time where this is fun and exciting and you thrive on the electricity. I’m just done with working my tail off for peanuts, in the end. Especially where I worked prior to this situation.

      Awwww… How kind are you?

      Liked by 1 person

  14. “It’s so beautiful,” she said before a sip of her Chardonnay. “Don’t you think?” Sam turned to me then, waiting for a response.

    “Yeah, sure,” I mumbled, toying with the calamari that I wasn’t sure was real or was pig anus. The dipping sauce was good though.

    I looked out at the fresh snow that was lightly laying another layer of white on the outside world, and turned back to the dining room. The waiters were beginning to light the candles at each table. Our server was approaching our table.

    “Listen,” I started, “ummm … we need to talk. Now.”

    Liked by 1 person

  15. And I love what you did with this … the thing that works … until it no longer works anymore. The pleasure in quiet moments and real interactions with the customers … instead the never-ending rush.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Mark. It’s definitely how I’ve been feeling lately. This forced break has been a confirmation of what I’ve been ruminating on since I started there (after a mere month…)

      Liked by 1 person

      • We all need these times to ruminate. I’m struggling with whether I made the right decision to retire — I’m worried about whether the work and income I need will materialize — but, ultimately, I desperately needed to end the stress that was my day job. I made the right decision, as did you!, just need to put in place the things needed to ensure continued security and stability.

        Liked by 1 person

        • I think you made the right decision and it’ll just be a reorganizing of what you still find necessary and what is not. This crazy thing we are living has shown a lot of us that we need a lot less than we thought we did.
          I didn’t make the decision; it was made for my by the closing of the restaurant, However, I don’t want to still be available when (if) they reopen. So. Yeah… I’ve got me some soul searching (and job hunting) to do. Thankfully my government is helping me out financially till then…

          Liked by 1 person

          • Yeah. It’s amazing what other countries are doing for those harmed by this as compared to the minimal level of help the U.S. government is providing.

            And I agree, it would be wonderful if people could recognize they simply do not need all they’ve convinced themselves they need as a result of this.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Of course, come tax time next year, it’s gonna bite us all in the ass but if we’re smart, we will plan for that…

            I like to think more of us will recognize that the simple things bring much more joy. I know, rose-coloured glasses…

            Liked by 1 person

  16. Pingback: Dinner and Delusion – MJL Stories

  17. Look in the little corner… you’ll see me quietly smiling and raising my glass to changes! 😉 clink clink!
    xoxoxoxoxoxo
    ps I’ve always wondered why some people feel an urge to make noises when in public places! 🙄

    Liked by 1 person

  18. I understand the feeling of wanting to move on, but not being sure where to move. Good luck figuring that one out! I do know that if I ever make my way back to restuarant staff again, it needs to be in the kitchen. The front of the house has no allure for me nowadays. Good luck!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Change is scary and recognising when you need a change is brave and wise. Good luck! I taught in busy active classrooms for years – nowadays I’m back to the quiet self I was a a child. I don’t regret teaching at all but semi-retirement (writing, gardening…) feels like coming home to myself.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Beautiful shot Dale… rich and pristine.
    Nice write, with an important realization at the end.
    You’ve made me think; Stop The World, I want to get off!
    Cutlery clatter is bone wracking.
    I was lousy at waitressing. I was the only one who owed money at the end of shifts. ⚡️💥

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Pingback: The Next Chapter – Crimson’s Creative Challenge #77 | A Dalectable Life

  22. Sounds like someone needs a new job with adventure to back it! Actually, I don’t mind crowds so much, the more the merrier. It’s a stimulus thing for me. I get a charge out of it. This is a really nice pic, Dale. The color and lighting are super! Hope the food was as good as yours if not better (but, then again, what could POSSIBLY be better than yours, yes?) 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yep. I’m done with serving. Most times I have fun but it’s hard on my feet. Crowds don’t bother me, either. Glad you enjoyed the pic. The food is really good and their clients are all regulars, which is a good sign. My cooking’s fine but not restaurant quality! 🙂

      Like

      • Well, I gotta say it was a super good-looking photo. I had the same problem in the TV studio. Too much standing. I sat down a few times, but I had enough. And footwear can be a problem, not so much in comfort, but for professional style.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Well, I am glad you liked the photo. Tell me about the footwear. If another tells me to invest in good shoes, Imma sock it to ’em! I have gone through five pairs. I am now listening to my feet who are yelling at me to switch!

          Like

          • Well, footwear for waiters and waitresses, to me, was always elegant and I’m sure not comfy on the tootsies, but they looked great. It’s just too bad they can’t invent a comfortable shoe that lasts long and looks elegant. Although, with this quarantine, I’ll just bet you someone has — since he or she had the time! 😀

            Liked by 1 person

          • I actually have a nice pair that is functional as well… however. I’m done. My left foot is a mess and keeps telling me that it is not pleased with me.

            Like

  23. I think we all crave the quiet sometimes. I’m not sure I’ll like it when everything is so busy again in the future. Great story. I worked in a hotel restaurant years ago. When it was busy we’d pray it was quiet but when it was quiet the time would drag. Maybe a steady flow is best x

    Liked by 1 person

Blogging is all about the exchange, don't be shy, I answer every one!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s