Home » Uncategorized » Start Young, Never Go Hungry – Friday Fictioneers

Start Young, Never Go Hungry – Friday Fictioneers

Good Wednesday morning, my peeps!  How serendipitous today’s Friday Fictioneer picture from Jennifer Pendergast, chosen by Rochelle, is a food-related one.  My eldest is 23 today and is a foodie and fabulous cook.  Of course I had to give a shout-out to him.  Happy birthday, Iain!

Should you want to try your hand at writing a delicious story to go with this picture, just click on the frog below and add your link.  Easy as baking cookies!

Frog Cooking Eat - Free photo on Pixabay

Click me!

Start Young, Never Go Hungry

He gets it from you, you know.

I’m not so sure about that!

Why’s that?

Believe it or not, his dad was teaching him how to make breakfast when he was all of seven years old.  Showed him how to turn on the oven for the hash browns, start the bacon, set the timer for the first side of the hash browns, flip when it was time, and scramble the eggs.

Wow.  But awful young, no?

Not really. I think it’s a skill parents should encourage from a young age.  Too many are afraid of the mess. It’s unfortunate, really.

192 thoughts on “Start Young, Never Go Hungry – Friday Fictioneers

  1. I was around 6 or 7 years old when I started learning to cook. My grandma taught me a lot, and then with both mom and dad working and weird school schedules, I had no choice but to cook or I’d have to go hungry. In high school, we had split sessions so I went to school from 12pm to 5pm. Several friends would ride their motorcycles over first thing in the morning and I cook us all breakfast.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think you were lucky as a result. Iain loves to cook and is bloody good at it, too! He is the cook of his gang and they all love it. He’s taken it to a whole ‘nother level. The boy will try anything.

      Liked by 2 people

      • My dad tried to get me to got to chef school. I had done stand in jobs at local restaurants, and we built cabinets and furniture for restaurants when I worked for an artisan woodworker when I was a teenager. I saw a lot of the behind the scenes workings of restaurants and said no thanks to chefdom.

        Liked by 1 person

        • It’s funny. My eldest has worked in restaurants and was looking forward to working in one as he finished electricity school. Then Covid happened and he never got to go back to said restaurant, which ended up closing. Everyone tells Iain he should have a career in that and he says no way way… Great for a short time, not forever…

          Liked by 1 person

          • We had restaurants under the second floor of our office for years. They were nothing but trouble for us. I was happy durring the months of piece and quite without noxious orders in between restaurants.

            Liked by 1 person

          • I had some real knock down and drag outs with the last two restaurant owners. I had to physically remove the last crazy owner from our office and I banned her from ever setting foot in our building again. I don’t know how she managed to have a restaurant. She was the most unpleasant, demon possessed person I have ever dealt with. Her restaurant didn’t survive the lockdowns, and has been vacant since June. Our offices have been pretty sparse also, since most people worked at home after the lockdowns. We four staff who are always in the office had been pretty happy with the peace and quite. But of course we didn’t gt that much peace and quite as many homeless people run around downtown yelling, cursing and screaming at the top of their lungs. That’s why there was no sigh from me to the the place behind.

            Like

  2. Clear instructions. Good. My first attempt at cooking I followed the instruction to heat the oil to boiling point. The boiling point of oil is rather high, but I did as I was told. I began to doubt the instructions when black smoke filled the kitchen.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh dear! Those instructions were definitely NOT clear.
      Iain has taken these basic skills and turned them up…. waaaaay up. He definitely has the same passion as his mother.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Dear Dale,

    I remember my youngest’s flare for experimentation in his early to mid-teens. He actually invented some delicious dishes. My eldest has a passion for cooking and helped make my matzo ball soup the best ever this year. 😉 Nope 7’s not to young. Happy birthday to Iain! Love the story.

    Shalom and lotsa delectable hugs,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Rochelle,

      I love the fearlessness in children. They will mix and match things you would never dream of and sometimes it turns out wonderful and others, not so much. Best way to learn. I love that you and your son worked together (from a distance)!
      I will tell him 🙂

      Shalom and lotsa Dalectable love 😉

      Dale

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Happy birthday again to your son! How lovely that he enjoys cooking, and you get to eat the results (at least sometimes). I remember our little daughters standing on chairs to knead challah dough–flour everywhere, but that was ok. 😀

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Great post, Dale. And the younger we start teaching them how to take care of themselves and to be responsible, the better. My Dad did the same for me. He showed me how to turn on the stove and fry eggs. He had me polish my shoes. I’m grateful to him for teaching at a young age how to groom myself and learn responsibilities.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. My mom cooked our meals throughout childhood. The only thing my dad did was man the barbeque and make omelets. She also made cookies and cakes and some other baking. But I don’t ever remember being incorporated into the cooking process. Oh sure, I grated the cheese when she made macaroni and cheese so I could nibble a the cheese before she used it. And I was the designated fire putter outer at the BBQ. But not much more than that.

    Years later, after I moved away, I started to learn to cook. Why? Because I got tired of Taco Bell, pizza, etc. A few years later, after I had embarked on culinary adventures. Learning how to make pizza, my own Mexican food, stir fries, etc., my mom marveled at how much I enjoyed cooking and wondered where I got it from because she disclosed at the time, “I always hated cooking.” I guess it’s difficult incorporating your children into something you don’t enjoy.

    Now … one of my boys is starting to enjoy making different things. He has finally realized how much money he can save if he cooks at home instead of getting take out for every meal. My other son is getting there, too, but it seems mostly what he does is man the barbecue while his girlfriend handles other type of cooking.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s funny. My mother never taught us how to cook either. When I moved out at 21, to go live with my boyfriend at the time, she dictated her basic recipes. I had started being interested with the previous boyfriend who loved to cook. Once I moved out – I just let ‘er rip!

      Iain has a natural love of food and I am the last person to stand in his way – it’s to my advantage 😉

      Ariel – well… not so much. Very basic but still would not starve if push came to shove.

      My mother is the type that – we’re at the beach, there are 20 of us and she says, come on over… and before you know it, something huge is being made and there is enough for all…

      My father loved to follow recipes and make fancy stuff. I think I got that from him 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • For the most part, my mom made the same stuff. Week after week. A little bit of variation and every once in awhile she would go completely off the list. But my childhood is filled with chicken prepared the same way over and over again. Spaghetti with the same sauce every time. White trash tacos. Leg of lamb or prime rib on holidays. When I moved out, I remember the first thing where I made something “from scratch” — spaghetti sauce without a recipe but based on input from a co-worker. It remains the foundation for spaghetti and lasagna 90% of the time I make those decisions.

        Then I bought my first cookbook — recipes from Bed and Breakfasts around the US. In there, I found a recipe for cinnamon rolls and began to learn about yeast and bread. And I’ve just kept continuing on. If I like something, I want to be able to make it. A couple of years ago, I learned how to make risotto — it is one of my older son’s go to dishes now. More recently, I’m experimenting with polenta.

        The possibilities are endless.

        Liked by 1 person

        • My mother also had her standards. Never one to follow a recipe. Like, ever! Years ago, I remember her asking ME how to make something!

          One year my father made, for my birthday, a smoked salmon pasta. Lordy it was good. They were fans of very fancy restaurants and we used to go every Sunday. So at age 4, my youngest sister was ordering escargot and boeuf bourgignon. Can you imagine? Her kids are all fans of foods of all sorts. The middle sister – we are not quite sure what happened there. Only recently have they ventured “off the beaten track”.

          Polenta is next on my list. 🙂

          Isn’t food fabulous?

          Liked by 1 person

  7. I’m afraid of the mess, but I try to do it anyway. My 8yo made breakfast this morning, just toast but he brought it to me in bed, so I was impressed. A life skill, you might as well start them young!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Well done, Dale – made me think of 7 Up, the brilliant TV series we’ve had running every seven years here in the UK. At the beginning the voiceover says “give me a child until he’s seven and I will show you the man”. The series follows children from all different backgrounds, from the age of 7. Your writing always makes me think and this week also makes me certain that your son had the best of starts in life!

    Liked by 1 person

    • What a wonderful show! I love that I make you think 🙂 I’m thinking we did pretty well with him. The other one, too – just not into cooking like his brother 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Everyone should have the ability to cook a meal. I am glad my mother let me cook occasionally as a teen (not that talented at seven years). Both my girls won’t go hungry for sure and while I cook better they are way better than me in baking.
    And those father’s day breakfasts have improved since when they were five years old 😉
    Best wishes to your son for his birthday and those photos look yummy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Absolutely! I think all parents should give that gift. And how wonderful that your girls have been given it.
      Thank you. It was a lovely day.

      Like

  10. Oh how I agree with you! I taught my four to cook – two boys and two girls. Now the boys prefer to be in charge in their respective kitchens, so I must have got it right! Happy birthday to Iain.
    BTW – I used the word serendipitous only yesterday, much to the consternation of a friend who I thought would have known it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Wonderful that you did. And I’ve no doubt Iain will be the cook in his future relationship(s) 😉
      It’s such a great word! Surprised your friend didn’t know it. Goes to show!

      Like

  11. Iain sounds like a wonderful son. My mother could cook a few things we all liked and passed the recipes down to us. I cooked to feed my husband and three hungry sons. I didn’t pass on a thing. My sons married good cooks and my oldest grandson is a fabulous cook. Nobody’s going hungry, not even me. I live on Stouffer’s Lean Cuisine. No wonder my sons say I have no food imagination. They love me anyway

    Liked by 1 person

    • He really is. He drives me crazy but he also makes me laugh. He comes off as a cold, tough guy but is a much inside.
      My mother is not a fancy cook but everything she makes is delicious. She can whip up a meal for 20 on what seems like nothing. I got that from her. My father was a fancy-pants who loved trying new recipes – he was a BBQ king and really evolved cooking-wise once my parents split up – I get that part from him 🙂
      You did what you did and that was enough 🙂 That one of your grandchildren is a fabulous cook is wonderful.
      And they love you. Period! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Yep! And in our case it was my mom (my dad did no cooking – or any other house chores for that matter – other than hog the BBQ once a year on Independence Day after others did all the prep and when others did all the clean up following …). All us girls were in the kitchen young, helping out, cleaning up, messing up, making a mess, trying again, learning-on-the-job. We all learned how to cook and bake and prep and estimate and follow a recipe early. It’s one of the most practical life skills a parent (or any caregiver adult or older sibling) can give a child IMO. There’s a know-how that simplifies life tremendously when you can make something to eat out of just about anything in the pantry. I’m totally with you on this!
    And … your son is an amazing cook! (I think he takes after BOTH his parents, though).
    🙂 Na’ama

    Liked by 1 person

  13. When I was a child, I loved the breakfasts I concocted with my father. That usually meant my mother wasn’t feeling well, was away, or it was something like Mother’s Day or her birthday. My father wasn’t much of a cook, but he was creative when it came to breakfast. Frozen fries chopped up were hash browns, left over baked beans, bacon (crisp as possible), fried eggs (the yolks usually broke). A real trencherman breakfast. I helped Mom with breakfast as soon as she trusted me with a spatula — I got to turn her silver dollar pancakes. I would watch for the bubbles to appear, then flip them over. Because they were small (that’s how pancakes should be according to my mother), we had mile high stacks (or so it seemed to the younger me) with real maple syrup (always) and butter. Shrove Tuesday meant pancakes for supper. Don’t remember if we had bacon.
    So good your son is learning the art of the breakfast — seven is not too young at al.

    Liked by 1 person

    • What a wonderful share, Lorraine! So glad my story did that for you… and Shrove Tuesday still means pancakes for supper in my house!
      He is way past his age-seven breakfasts… The young man is now making sophisticated stuff I never would have dreamed of!

      Like

  14. I loved the photo of your son on FB and Instagram. He looks like a fun, fun-loving guy, and now I realize a good cook as well. I agree with teaching them young. My kids could crack a perfect egg by 12, but amazingly, my grandkids learned at 7!! They “crack” me up. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Pam. Do you know stupid Instagram has blocked me for some reason? I can’t comment, upload, nothing!
      Anyway… Thank you. He is rather fun and loves life.
      Wonderful for both your kids and grandkids! Hyuck! Hyuck! Hyuck!

      Liked by 1 person

      • WHAT? That makes no sense for Instagram to block you. Hope you give them “what for” and get back on there. Your nature shots – and FOOD – always make me smile. Oh, and the adorable dog too, of course. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • I am soooooo pissed. This morning I managed to post their message! But I still can’t like anyone’s posts or comment on them…
          Thank you. You are so kind. I have to get some more of Zeke. I fear he is not long for this world 😦

          Liked by 1 person

          • Oh no. Zeke is such a … BEING. My brother’s dog, Oliver, who I love like a nephew, is dying of lymphoma. Lab/golden, 13 years old. I’m going to travel 8 hours in a week or so to pet him one more time. Dogs are our special angels, for sure.

            Liked by 1 person

          • I know. I am heartbroken. He is 11 1/2 and his back legs have trouble. It’s almost like he can’t control them – they cross, wobble. We take short walks and he drags them until they bleed. I just have to gather up my love and make the call. The boys have to be on the same page and they are almost there.

            Liked by 1 person

          • This is exactly what happened to our 12 year old Golden. The back legs gave out. Couldn’t pee/poop and stand up. It was time. We petted him the entire time the doc helped release him. Damn – cried for days. (Still do, sometimes.) So so sorry Dale.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Oh damn. He still can do his business. He stands and looks at me with those eyes of his. He still wants to go on short walks. The poor guy is so dirty but I can’t have him groomed because he could never stand for that length of time. (He hates being brushed which doesn’t help!) So I try to do a little bit at a time.
            I’m not ready. But I will when I see his eyes are less enthusiastic.

            Liked by 1 person

  15. What a wonderful story about an amazing son, and happy birthday to him. This all sounds and looks so delicious, I’m getting hungry. I am not a good cook, I much prefer baking and am decent at that if I put enough time into it. I do cook out of necessity but it is always a chore. I much prefer to eat. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  16. All kids should learn to cook, as young as possible.
    Of course, my mother wouldn’t have me in the kitchen. I was a disaster. For which my children were eternally grateful. I learned to cook edible food!

    Like

  17. Q

    That’s how to do it, get em cooking (I don’t bake) early and then leave em to get the job done whenever they put their nose up at dinner time over something on the menu that is not to their liking. Amazing how quickly they change that tune OR cook up their own! Win meeting win is what I call it.

    B

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Everybody else in my family has a way with food and/or plants. Not me. It’s always been words with me. Every once in a while, I’ll cook something, and it has to be creative, and it usually comes out pretty good.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. I loved this! Wonderful memories of a good dad taking time with his boys early on. I remember my daughter was around the same age when she made her first batch of muffins. She’s an avid baker now and enjoys cooking, a gift from her father (not me – hehe). I hope Iain had a wonderful birthday! Seeing the yummy food he created, I’m now hungry. A very sweet story!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Brenda. It’s funny, he started at 7, then took a long break… since his father’s death (6 years ago), he has really gotten into cooking at a level that is constantly surprising me. He did have a good one!

      Like

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