Home » Challenge » Uprooted – Friday Fictioneers

Uprooted – Friday Fictioneers

It’s Wednesday and you know what that means, right?  Well, most times it means I Friday Fictioneer.  And this time, just before I have to hit the door for work!  Woot!  Thank you to Rochelle for hosting week after week, and this week, thank you to Brenda Cox for the loan of her interesting image!  Click on the frogs below to play by adding the link to your own 100-word story!

©Brenda Cox

613 Frog On Log Stock Photos, Pictures & Royalty-Free Images - iStock

Click to play!

 

I don’t understand how things like this go down.  Everything is perfect and then… uprooted  In the blink of an eye.  Why do I put up with it?  Every move means starting over, rebuilding in an unknown environment.  I have to relearn where to go and how to go about getting it.  The kids are amazing, though. So far, they seem to thrive on each new change. For them, it’s a new world to explore with new friends to make.  How did I manage to raise such open and enthusiastic children when I, myself am tormented each and every time?

115 thoughts on “Uprooted – Friday Fictioneers

  1. Q

    Nature is a mother, in any existence. I love the idea of coming back as other things . . like maybe being a butterfly in my next life. Granted, I would probably be a nasty ass butterfly, but at least I’d look pretty. A tree as a part of life’s cycle . . we rarely think about it that way but why not? They’re THE most important of all the skyscrapers in this world. I do love how you made it happen here, and maybe I’ll have to think on this some more now as a result.

    And attitude. It’s amazing how the right kind of attitude gets you through the most unforgiving of storms.

    This 100 packs a helluva existential punch, Q. Out? Meet standing!

    B

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Dear Dale,

    I love what you did with the prompt. Always the mistress of stepping outside the box. It is hard to start over when plans are uprooted (like purple tents 😉 ) And it does get harder as we get older. Well done and I’m chuffed to see you on the Squares this week. 😀

    Shalom and lotsa unchanging hugs,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Rochelle,

      I love that you love my stepping outside of the box – you do know how much I love to do that. I imagine it would get harder as we get older. And hey! I was there last week, too 😉

      Shalom and lotsa stable love,

      Dale

      Like

  3. A very thoughtful piece, Dale. Perhaps children go along so easily with the moves because they have the stability of the parent. The family is the home more than the place.

    But–uprooted trees are scary (and sad).

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you, Merril. I think the parents’ attitude makes all the difference, even though some kids don’t do as well as others. I like to think they are in the minority.

      Up-rooted trees are very scary! If this had been a CCC prompt, I had a “matchy-matchy” photo 😉

      Liked by 2 people

      • You’re welcome. Also, kids don’t have to deal with bills, movers, change of address forms, etc. I was happy to move from Dallas to the Philadelphia suburbs when I was in 7th grade. It gave me a chance to start over, but I would not have been happy to move to a new city when I was in high school. I guess kids who move often get used to it.

        I have photos, too, somewhere. Yes, VERY scary.

        Liked by 1 person

        • This is true!! And, I have to agree, the age of the children plays a big part in how easily they can adapt to the change (depending on the child, of course).

          Sometimes you have to think there are powers involved that save or don’t!

          Liked by 1 person

  4. Since meeting my husband we have had 19 house moves covering six different countries. I’ve got to say every one has been a thoroughly enjoyable (if at times slightly fraught) experience. I’m still looking forward to the next, even though I suspect there may not be one. But your story underlines the difference between people, and I sympathise with those who view the upheaval with less enthusiasm than I do/did. It’s good when the kids are not affected. Good story, Dale.

    Liked by 5 people

    • I actually envy you! I’m still in the same town I grew up in! I moved out of it for six years (and then moved a few times). Of course now, that my sisters are still within a short car ride away, it would be ever more difficult to move away. I imagine once you’ve done it a couple of times it gets easier.
      I like to think I’d be like you – enthusiastic and enjoy the new experience.
      Glad you enjoyed my take, Sandra.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Josh. It’s true. We don’t know how other people deal with certain situations. One can think it’s not but whup and for another, it’s the end of the world.

      Like

      • The worst for me was always changing schools. And starting new jobs. I never feel like I fit in and that makes it worse!
        I would like to move into the middle of the rainforest I think though. Nice and peaceful.

        Like

    • Thank you so much, Penny. I cannot imagine what it is really like as I lived in the same house until I was 21 and then after six years, bought said house! (I’m no longer there, now) but I have army friends who have had to pick up and move every 2-3 years and I know for some, it is more difficult than for others.
      So appreciate your comment, Penny!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. If I’m truthful here, that image took a stab at my heart. It’s heartbreaking to see fully grown trees downed like that. I’ve been in my current location so long, I’ve forgotten how different it was when I moved here; I often wonder if changes is what’s kept me here (and my previously house) for decades or if I’m just that boring. 🤣

    Liked by 3 people

  6. I was an uprooted child – three separate secondary schools in three years, always the new girl. I was taken from an urban jungle to rural idyll which I didn’t appreciate one bit. I wanted underground stations that popped out of the pavement, not scenes from The Railway Children. But a few years ago a friend said, “You had such an interesting childhood – there’s nothing to write about in mine.” And I’ve survived to be a glass half full person – still a London kid at heart though. Dale, your posts always make me think – such an interesting take.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Perspective is everything, isn’t it? Must have been difficult to have to adjust from city to country… and tell me, do you live in the city now? 🙂
      I’ve no interesting stories, either, like your friend 🙂
      So glad I evoke something 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • You always do, Dale! I live very happily in Alton, Hampshire a “market town” i.e. a small rural town surrounded by villages. It still has a market every Tuesday and Saturday, where you can get food and plants and clothes, watches and shoes, stuff like that. But I’m very near the station so I can get to London easily (when they properly let us, of course). The surrounding scenery is rolling hills and farmland, so I have a foot in each camp now. Thanks for asking 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Aww thanks. Happily living where you do makes all the difference. It’s sounds lovely! And being a ride away from the city is perfect for you to get a dose of excitement… When life gets back to some form of normal…
          Thank you for sharing a part of you, Jilly.

          Liked by 1 person

  7. I’m always fascinated where writers take a prompt, and your vignette here is wonderfully complex. Yes, I think a number of “beings” are talking here – a mother, a tree, all of us who are uprooted at one time or another. Some of us more than others. And a death/divorce/move/change of job all count as things that “uproot” us. ❤

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you, Pam! I never know where I’ll end up before hand… well, not that far ahead, anyway 🙂
      Glad you see this as wonderfully complex 🙂
      And boy oh boy are you ever right. So many things have the potential to uproot us! xoxo

      Liked by 2 people

  8. It sounds like she put her best face on for the kids, which is both difficult and rewarding. Good for her. The children sound like my children. Seeing all of our moves as a new adventure. Not that it wasn’t a challenge from time to time, but my daughter and son fit in wherever they go because they’ve learned to adjust to new situations and environments. A thought-provoking story as always, Dale!

    Liked by 3 people

    • I think so, too. I’m sure any move is not without challenges – especially when other countries are involved! Good for you children and you!
      Glad you thought so, Brenda!

      Like

  9. I think responsibilities are a slow death. They never end. That’s why people can think of their childhoods as happy. They weren’t responsible for anything. It cracks me up when people say they want to be happy the way they were when they were young. Good luck with that. No bills, no cleaning, shopping for food, cooking, laundry, working, taking care of the house and kids, and all the rest. Easy to be happy when you can do whatever you like and everything else is taken care of by others. Sigh.

    Liked by 3 people

    • My boys only lived through one move and it was a couple of miles away from their original home. But they did live through their share of hardships so I like to think we’ve helped each other out. Thank you for your always so kind words Ina. xo

      Like

  10. Great story, Dale. Personality sure plays a role but I think for the kids it’s most important that their mum (or parents) represent ‘home, love, safety, care’ to them and from there they can venture and spread their wings. If the parents don’t provide that sense of ‘belonging’ wherever they are, it would be hard even for the adventurous types.

    Liked by 3 people

  11. I love this story, Dale, though I’m sorry for your anguish.
    I think very often parents who suffer torment do their best to make sure their children don’t suffer the same pain. I’m glad your children are open and enthusiastic. They obviously feel the security of having a very loving Mum. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you, Jenne… No worries. This is fiction 🙂
      Though my kids have had things to deal with and par pretty good (They have a mother who is pretty resilient)

      Like

  12. I was an uprooted child; we were a very nomadic family. Between kindergarten and grade six, I attended 4 (or was it five — counting on my fingers) “new to me” schools. Been living in the same house for 16 years now — world record for me.
    Kids can be very resilient, as can their moms.

    Liked by 3 people

    • So many have had to live through that. Honestly, my kids only had to change once during elementary school and it seemed to be just fine to them. We moved not so far away from the old house (a 15-20 bicycle ride away, really) so that may have helped.
      Kids definitely are very resilient!

      Like

  13. I know that some children love the change, it’s and adventure. Whereas us adults have all the worry that goes with moves. I have lived in 22 different places, (job took me all over the place), eventually got used to it.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I’m sure you’re right. The first time I moved was at 21. Then I moved five more times in 6 years before buying my parent’s house that I grew up in. I’m no longer there but still in the same town.
      I couldn’t imagine leaving the south shore of Montreal, never mind change province or gasp! Country!

      Like

    • My young uns moved when they were in Grades 4 and 2. And then again two years ago when I moved to this house around the corner from our old one – they were 19 and 21. Not too traumatising, I should think!

      Like

  14. Thunder, does this mean you parked the lawn mower by the kitchen sink?
    Then the dishes got done by one of your sons & one of his new friends?
    It’s like a whole new dimension to the meaning of uprooted.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Pingback: Uprooted – Friday Fictioneers – correct vibestv

  16. I guess youngsters thrive on adventure, each one representing new and fulfilling moments in a life that holds wonderment and thrill seeking at every juncture. Sure, being uprooted can be seen as an obstacle and yet with that leap of faith anything can be achieved.

    I have enjoyed reading you today Dale.

    Andro

    Liked by 1 person

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