Home » Friday Fictioneers » A Place to Live or to Visit, That is the Question – Friday Fictioneers

A Place to Live or to Visit, That is the Question – Friday Fictioneers

Would you look at that?  It’s Friday.  Thank gawd!  And I’m playing Friday Fictioneers today on a Friday.  Wasn’t gonna play at all but hey, only fools don’t change their minds, they say. I ain’t no fool.  Not to be confused with being foolish. I can be plenty foolish on occasion, I assure you.  This week our leader extraordinaire, Rochelle, has pilfered, sweetly requested, this photo from Bradley Harris. I don’t know about any of you “enjoying” the chill of this particular winter – no comment from youse guys in places like Texas, k?, but I could easily imagine my own self looking at this here view.  If you can as well and are inspired to write your own 100-word story, why don’t you and then plop the link to said story by clicking on my surfer frog below!

©Bradley Harris

Frog beach Images, Stock Photos & Vectors | Shutterstock

click me to play

Wouldn’t you just love to live here and be able to see this every day?

I don’t know, to be honest.

Seriously? Why not? As far as sun destinations go, Hawai’i is the most temperate. Less inclined to have hurricanes and whatnot.

Oh, I know.  But I think I’d get bored of it all. I actually like having four distinct seasons.

Even winter?

Yes, even winter.

Well I, for one, can easily see myself living here for the rest of my life.

Perfect! It will give me a place to come and visit!

You do that.

I most certainly will.

 

 

150 thoughts on “A Place to Live or to Visit, That is the Question – Friday Fictioneers

    • Same here. Mick dreamt of being a snowbird for at least four months of the year. I was not that enthusiastic, to tell the truth.
      Definitely, go hang out on a beach for up to a month (if there is more than beach bathing to do!) but live full-time? Methinks not. Tell me about it. The forecast changed dramatically. It was supposed to be more “clement” than what they are now calling for! Ugh. It’s been a cold ‘un. (Or I’m becoming wimpier with age…)

      Liked by 2 people

        • I bet. Marc was saying he is totally uncomfortable with the ridiculously warm (for this time of year) temps. It feels unnatural, he says. I’d have to see if we are far from our norm or what (I can’t remember from one year to the next, to be honest…)

          Liked by 2 people

          • No kidding. If you at least had precipitation to go with it, it would be half bad. I don’t want to think of this summer. I know ours has been getting more and more humid and gross-hot. and no longer just for two weeks in the summer. Now we get a few two-week heat waves.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Heat and humidity are definitely not my cup of tea. I stay out of the sunshine in the summer. Having an altitude of a mile high is a quick guarantee for a sunburn if ever there was one. I’ve practically forgotten what precipitation is.

            Liked by 2 people

          • They are misery-inducing. I stay out of the sunshine as well. I sit in the shade when outside and get absolutely no pleasure from feeling the sun burn down on me. Proof the ozone is not what it used to be, I used to never burn when I was a kid. Now? Ugh.
            No precipitation is not a good thing.

            Liked by 2 people

  1. Your place, yes! Hawaii no! I would get bored with little changes to the seasons. Although an occasional eruption and dodging lava flows would add spice to island life.

    Liked by 3 people

      • Hawaii is not on my visit list. I would consider going to a remote island with lots of critters and interesting landscapes to photograph. But I have no interest in beaches and hotels. And I don’t like Spam.

        Liked by 3 people

        • There is more to see than beaches. I went on a Hawai’ian cruise for my honeymoon and was pleasantly surprised. We spent almost no time on the beach! And I had no Spam, either 😉
          Plus, no insult to you, I barely felt like I was in the States 😉

          Liked by 2 people

          • That’s quite possible. Maybe it also has to do with where we were born and raised. In my case, I never left my friggen home town (well, briefly, but I didn’t go far) so I can’t even imagine living in a one-two season place.
            I imagine army brats have a different view of things.

            Liked by 2 people

    • There are those who can do so – I know I could not. Hell, I couldn’t even move to Montreal as I would no longer be 10-15 minutes away from my sisters! However, a contract job of a fixed amount of time? Maybe I could!

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Q

    Hawaii is great weather-wise, which is both a blessing and a curse to my way of thinking. The blessing is the wardrobe doesn’t need a whole lot of adjustments to it since, well, yanno. Other than keeping a few sweaters in the closet, you’re all set. The curse for me is that I like changes in the season, and that ain’t happening on the island. Unless you really do consider sixty degrees to be a cold blast.

    Surfing is great, but I wasn’t all that adept. I loved the swimming out and I loved the idea of catching a wave. And I loved the swimming back out . . .

    B

    Liked by 4 people

  3. Yeah, much though I am known to complain about the change of weather and my preference for warmth … I don’t really think I’d like it quite as much if it was all there was. And I do, in fact, enjoy the beauty of the seasons, even the bundling up of winter (well … as long as I have some choice about how much time I have to spend in it … 🙂 ) . PS. I think Hawaii is fine, but someone’s gotta tug it closer to the mainland. It is ridiculously too far … 😉

    Liked by 4 people

  4. Hawai’i. Hmm. I’d be tempted by the weather. I’d be tempted by the sea. And at this time of year in Devon, with a temperature of 5 Celsius and mud underfoot everywhere, I could almost succumb to temptation…
    Nah, if I were going to move, I’d go and live in Greece. I fell in love with the country in 1975, and still hanker after living there permanently!

    Liked by 4 people

  5. I hate moving. All that packing, the plants, the cats, shedding of all the important unimportant stuff that collected over the years.
    So, guess I’ll just visit.
    Of course moving into a clean fresh place with no clutter is exciting.
    OMG…. we’ve been talking about moving.
    Look where your little chit chat is taking me! I’m moving in circles. ⚡️💥

    Liked by 4 people

    • Hahaha! I am not a fan, either. While it is nice to get rid of the stuff, it’s going through it that is overwhelming.
      I’m thinking visiting is a good idea.
      Oh man! No way! I send you good wishes should you decide to make the move… 🧚‍♀️✨

      Liked by 2 people

        • Yeah, no kidding. I keep trying to convince myself to call my mother an invite her over for dinner… But that means I have to dress (!), drive over to her place, bring her here. Drive her back after. I’m such a bad daughter. I really should have bought the other house so I could be in the same town as her and my two sisters…

          Liked by 2 people

          • Don’t worry about it!
            Your sisters are there.
            I sent mom $! She was always happy about that.
            I moved away from my home city at 17. Best decision I ever made. I suppose you love your family, though.
            Mine were okay, as long as I lived in another city. Personality disorders ran amok.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Oh, they have her over regularly. I look like the schlumph now.
            Wow. To me, that takes so much courage to leave so young. I am really close to my family. Hell, I couldn’t even move to the island of Montreal as I would be too far a drive from my sisters. Of course, when Mick suggested it, our babies were small and we (sisters and I) saw each other 2-3 times per week. I would have been isolated.
            I cannot even fathom not being close to them.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Schlumph, you?
            I don’t think so.
            Sounds like you are/were a close knit family.
            It did not take any courage for me to leave. It would have taken courage to stay.
            My childhood and youth read like a 20th century Dickens novel.
            One Example: At 13 my parents lost our home and sank into alcoholism. They found us an old home by the river, just outside the city. It went with a banquet hall “The Copa”. It was a mile off the highway. That was a hell walk in the winter to the school bus on the highway.
            So they drank, and my sister and I were left running the banquet hall. It held 600 people. They allowed 3 glasses per person.
            Everyone smoked.
            We set the banquet tables, checked coats, bounced drunks and cleaned up. We gathered the glasses, dumped the ashtrays, washed the tables and floors and stacked the chairs. There was no dishwasher. We washed and dried all the glasses & ashtrays by hand.
            We did not get paid. Although I did learn to steal money from the coat check. I was not allowed to go out with friends until the hall was clean.
            I believe today they would call it child labour, and that is illegal.
            I ran away on a winter’s night, through fields in thigh high snow.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Oh my goodness, Resa. What a horrible thing to live through. If we are to take our experiences as lessons, it surely taught you how to survive. I can completely understand you leaving for your own betterment. And do you have a relationship with your sister? Younger or older?

            Liked by 2 people

          • Younger. She died from lymphoma about 8 years ago.
            We were not close. She had schizophrenia. It’s not possible to get close to that person.
            She was on heavy meds from the time she was 13. I believe all that poison caused her lymphoma.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Thank you Thunder!
            You are adorable, and have had your own crosses to bear.
            It’s difficult to feel sorry for myself or her. I look around and see many people born into the horror of drought, war, Aids in Africa and more.
            I’ve had a great life really, and she was always a world away from me.
            She was institutionalized for a year or so in her 20’s. However, she was pretty, with raven hair so long it swept the floor. It was longer than Crystal Gayle’s hair. Men worshipped her because of her hair.
            They did everything for her, were her slaves.
            She loved that. It was her power, and she manipulated with it.
            It wasn’t until the cancer when her hair fell out that it all changed.
            I did help her out with $$$ during that time.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Well. I don’t know about adorable but I still feel for you.
            I am so glad you feel you’ve had/have a good life. It serves no purpose to feel sorry for one’s self. Perspective.
            I am still sorry for your sister. You mentioned your sister’s hair before. We use what we have, I guess. And that must have been traumatising for her to lose her power.
            We do what we can for our loved ones – no matter how close we are.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Yes!
            I visited her quite a bit after her diagnosis.
            I was invited in at that point.

            Okay.. there are always fab memories.
            She loved practical jokes.
            When we had to work “The Copa”…. the main entertainment was usually a Polka band – The Polka Dots.
            Weddings were the #1 customers.
            So, as guests arrived, there would be a receiving line, with several of the Polka Dots..the accordion, a percussion guy and 1 more.
            As guests entered, the band would burst into a wedding tune. People would shake hands,kiss, etc.
            Jacquie would go out the back door, and come in the main door. Of course every time she came in, the band would burst into music.
            She would keep going out the back and coming in the front.
            They could not see who it was, until they had already started playing.
            She would do this until the receiving line was over.
            That band did not see the humour, but she laughed the laugh!
            Quite frankly, I laughed, too!

            Liked by 2 people

          • That’s good. I imagine there would be some sort of regret if you hadn’t been let in.
            And I love that you are focusing on the fun memories. What a card she was! 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

  6. I have parts of me that love living in four seasons–one with lots of snow–and other parts that would just like it all to be easy. But, alas, perhaps that’s a pipe dream. Perhaps “easy” is not for us earthlings except in fits & starts.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Oh, I feel you! Today is freeze your patootie off cold so, looking at that image from Hawai’i is most enticing… However, I don’t know if I would tire of it. (I think I would.)

      Liked by 2 people

  7. I grew up on the coast of Northern California. We had two seasons, foggy and rainy. While I miss the ocean and trees, I like living in the mountains where it snows sometimes and alternately gets too hot to go outside. It’s kind of nice to have seasons.

    Liked by 4 people

  8. I am not a beach lover. I’ve not lived in Hawaii year round, but it is nice.
    Two years on Guam. I did not extend that, but many of us did. While I got off the island often, my family did not.
    California was next and in my opinion, much better. Mild winters got old, but we found winter in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.
    As much snow as you’ve had, it would panic folks most places I lived, but not all. Well done story.. For me, people matter more than places.

    Liked by 4 people

  9. Dear Dale,

    Finally, I’m getting around to your story. Me? I’d love to live in Hawaii. Miss seasons? NO way. I’ll just paint them from your photos. 😉 Although I’ve heard the cost of living is outrageous there. Still, I’d like to experience it for myself. Maybe go and give it a year.
    And…for your information, Missy. I actually did ask sweetly if I could use Bradley’s photo. Ththththt.
    Love the conversation which weighs out the pros and cons.

    Shalom and lotsa temperate hugs,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Rochelle,

      Hey, better late than never 😉 Of course you would, you mermaid. And of course, I would supply you 😉
      And of course you did ask sweetly. I said it, didn’t I?
      Glad you enjoyed this back and forth.

      Shalom and lotsa weather-friendly love,

      Dale

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Four seasons? What’s that? Here in Perth, we have chilly, hot, and f*&^ing hot. 😀. No four seasons like you Canadians but we have brilliant beaches. Jesting aside, every season is beautiful in its own way. Cozy winter fire…

    Liked by 4 people

    • November sucks. Except this year… it wasn’t it’s usual month-long dreariness, for some reason. We only had a week of that.
      Hahaha! Love it. Sorry, luv, I’ve not the room to have you stay over, but not too far away is an inn I am sure you’ll enjoy… 😉

      Like

  11. Totally feeling this one! I loved visiting family in Hawaii, but not sure I would want to live there. Visiting for a while is perfecto. Hope the one who moves there gets to move there and the other person gets to visit, often. So many feels in this story.

    Liked by 2 people

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