Home » Family » For Dad on Father’s Day

For Dad on Father’s Day

A few days ago, Ally, from The Spectacled Bean (why I kept seeing Speckled instead of Spectacled, is beyond me, and I apologize, Ally), shared some quirky deets about her father.  This was inspired by her watching the last season of Grace and Frankie (which I loved, too), in particular, the Paprikash episode where Grace reconnects with her long-lost brother on false pretenses because she has a hankering for chicken paprikash and desperately wants the family recipe which her brother knows off by heart.  He never got a chance to know their father and wants Grace to share her memories.  Grace doesn’t want to because it hurts too much.  Her brother comes to realise that he is not there because Grace has missed him and goes to leave but Frankie, in true Frankie fashion, finds a way for him to stay.  With every memory Grace shares, he gives her an ingredient.

Quite the intro to the raison d’être of this post, eh?  I purposefully waited until today, Father’s Day, to share my list.  I was lucky enough to have him until I was 49, unlike 15 for Ally.  To think my kids were 15 and 16 when they lost theirs.  Sigh.

So, without further ado, here are ten things about my dad

1️⃣  He was thrilled to be mistaken for Captain Picard – it’s hard to get a picture because Dad always smiled with his teeth, while Sir Patrick smiles closed-mouthed… During the Pandammit, when Patrick Stewart read the Shakespearean sonnets, shared on FB and Twitter, I kept being taken aback.  They have many facial expressions that matched; it was uncanny.

2️⃣  He loved to listen to the Boston Pops on Sunday nights – we really think it was to annoy the shit out of Mom more than love of the music.

3️⃣  He loved Rod Stewart’s “Do Ya Think I’m Sexy” and would dance around in his goofy way, while clicking his tongue to the beat.

4️⃣  He insisted on setting a nice table, using bowls for ketchup and other condiments – do NOT even think of putting a bottle of ketchup on the table!

5️⃣  After he died, we found a penny in every single coat pocket because he always kept the ones he found, saying they were Pennies from Heaven, from his grandson, Austin.

6️⃣  He did a 180° flip from saying how much he paid for stuff to how little.  Having been raised on welfare, he planned on having more than enough one day – and did, which he was so proud of and flaunted.  Then he got older and wiser and realised that saving a buck was nothing to be ashamed of – which, of course, he now went on and on about.

7️⃣  He excelled at playing the overseer when construction projects were underway at any of our houses 😏 Though, in fairness, he was very adept at putting hammer to nail as well.

8️⃣  He always dressed well.  Loved looking sharp, whether casual or formal.

9️⃣  He was a natural artist.  One day, he decided to paint. So he did.  He sold most of his paintings, too.  And then he stopped.  I guess I take after him for that – losing interest after a while…

Painting Dad made for me

🔟  He had no regrets, he said. Had a wonderful life and stood behind all his choices.  When he wanted something he went for it.  It took him years to finally get a sailboat.  Until it was a reality, sail magazines graced the house all over the place, top of the toilet, night stand, living room table.  I think it was a sort of vision board exercise.

I’m sure so many other things will come to mind once I press publish, but like Dad, I’ll stand behind my choices.  Thank you again, Ally, for inspiring me to write this post.

 

143 thoughts on “For Dad on Father’s Day

  1. Great memories of your father! 💞 I have never watched the Speckled Bean but I really need the recipe for Chicken Paprikash. My husband is Hungarian and it was one of his favourite dishes that his mother used to make.

    Liked by 5 people

  2. He did look like captain Picard. This is a super tribute. I really like that painting. He obviously loved life, made the best of it, and you are following suit.

    Liked by 5 people

    • He did, didn’t he? I swear, every time I happened upon Sir Patrick reading a sonnet, I did a double-take. It means a lot to me. And the other day, I went to his widow’s and saw, again, a few more of them. I should have photographed them because they are real beauties. Next time!
      And yes, I am definitely my father’s daughter when it comes to loving life. It’s a grand compliment, Tim. Thank you 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

    • Thank you, Dawn. Yes, he was both of those (and could be a pain in the butt, too 😉 )
      Didn’t he? When he was younger, he looked like our former prime minister Pierre Trudeau…
      It’s when I read one of her posts or maybe it was her about me page that she said that yes, she wore spectacles… I looked at the name again and had a D’oh! moment!

      Liked by 2 people

  3. What a lovely, heartfelt post, Dale. It’s a beautiful tribute. Your dad sounds like someone who would be fun to be with. Wonderful photos, too. (Of course.)

    That’s so funny about him and Patrick Stewart–but yes, a definite resemblance.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Thank you, Merril. He was a lot of fun. Had the gift of the gab… I wonder who I take after… 🙄🎵 And thank you. He was also a big picture taker at one point.

      He loved being asked if he was him – of course, none of my pictures work as well but watching Sir Patrick read the sonnets? Good lord… it was uncanny.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Lisa. I did – when we weren’t fighting 😉
      He had a huge joie de vivre that I inherited. Me too! Unfortunately, not long after he had to sell the boat. Broke all of our hearts.

      Liked by 1 person

      • You’re welcome. I understand about boats, nuff said about them. They have a “new” thing here in the area now, where you can “rent” a boat for a day. They have huge boat storage with all kinds of types of boats and they are stored on racks. You pick what you want and their machines pull it off the rack and put it in the water for you. Best idea I ever heard for the casual boater.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Wow. My father’s step-son sadly had to sell his own sailboat after his last separation. Broke his heart as he had been sailing since he was a baby. He is now looking to rent one for a couple of weeks this summer. Mucho bucks, though.

          Liked by 1 person

          • It’s a funny community. I really hope he is able to buy a new boat one day.
            But someone with his experience can easily rent a boat – no extra captain necessary.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Oh, I understand. No, he wants to rent one for a couple of weeks. He has no trouble with that! When you have your years of experience and papers, you can rent without having the owner on board.
            Renting them for the summer is very expensive!

            Liked by 1 person

  4. What a wonderful and charming testimony to your father, Dale. Are not memories wonderful things?
    Well done. And by the way, you can always add things after you press publish. 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

    • He was, Jan. And I am told I look a lot like him (funny how growing up, I was all Mom and as time went on, it switched). He had a fabulous zest for life and I am rather glad I inherited it.
      Never too late to write yours, you know. Mine’s not here to read it.

      Like

  5. Thanks for linking to me in this post. As for thinking I’m speckled, not spectacled, that has happened before. No big deal, but thanks for figuring it out. It’s all about the eyeglasses with me.

    Your dad sounds great. I’m charmed by the idea that he’d dance around to “Do Ya Think I’m Sexy”! That’s a fun memory. His painting is beautiful. What a natural talent. And yes he looks like Sir Patrick Stewart. Uncanny, really.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Of COURSE I had to link 😉 It’s just so weird that I saw then (can’t see it now, though) as speckled! LOL.

      He was great. He loved Phoebe Snow and Leo Sayer, too. He was a card. I have to take pictures of his other pieces that are all around his widow’s house and share them. Right? Doesn’t he? When Stewart was reading the Shakespeare sonnets during the pandammit, my heart would stop until I realised it was him!

      Liked by 2 people

  6. What a beautiful post. Your dad did look like Jean Luc Piccard. Lol. And your finding of the pennies in his pockets was so very touching. It says a lot about who he was as a person. And I’m so glad he got his boat. Thanks for sharing your dad, Dale. I loved the memories. ❤

    Liked by 3 people

  7. What a beautiful tribute to your dad. What a handsome, funny, and dear man. I see now where you get your sense of humor 😉 The one about the pennies choked me up a bit, and I also see where you get your dear heart.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you so much, marie. He was and he was funny and charming and I definitely get my sense of humour from him 😉
      Wasn’t that something? Had us all in tears!
      You are so lovely to say so. 💕

      Liked by 1 person

    • Glad you see it, too! My dad would have been 80 this September 11th. Sir Patrick is going to be 82 in July. Close enough 😉
      Thank you and I am so glad you think he was interesting. I am lucky, Eilene.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Dear Dale,

    What a marvelous tribute to your dad. He sounds like a great person to know. I see where his daughter got her million dollar smile. Of course it sent me thinking of my dad whom I lost when I was 31. He had a sharp sense of humor that I thank him for passing down to his kids. Anway, I loved the pennies from Heaven. How sweet is that? Thanks for sharing.

    Shalom and lotsa memorable hugs,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Rochelle,

      Thank you, my friend. He was a character, that’s for sure. And I’ve heard tell I might have inherited that smile as well as the sense of humour from him. Those pennies hit us all in the feels as we went through his coats. So glad you came by 🙂

      Shalom and lotsa love filled with memories,

      Dale

      Liked by 1 person

  9. What a lovely post. I think what I like most is the joy of life that transpires throughout all the pictures. (And the text of course.)
    You probably look a bit of both, though your eyes are more your mother’s?
    You’re the third from the left of the four sitting on the boat?
    🙏🏻

    Liked by 4 people

    • Thank you. I am very glad that comes through!
      Yes, I have been both Monique’s and Larry’s daughter at different times of my life. It’s funny, I share a picture on FB and someone said I had his eyes. Go figure.
      And yes, the fourth is my youngest sister’s best friend and practically a member of our family.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I realized that mix very young, when I was about six. My father’s job was very social so lots of “new” people often came to the house, and I realized half “les grandes personnes” would say: “Oh. He looks like his mother.” And the other half: “OH. He looks just like his father.” People don’t see the same details in other people’s faces…
        So the 4th was your soup sister…😉

        Liked by 2 people

        • It’s funny. It’s only as I got older that I got the Dad part. It’s like my kids, Some say the oldest is his father, some say, he’s me; The youngest the same.
          Soup sister… I’ll say yes?

          Liked by 1 person

          • Câline de bine? Tu sais que les Français traduisent les romans Québecois? Les éditeurs pensent que les lecteurs ne comprendraient pas “se pogner une job”. Ou une “moppe”. A mon avis y-z’ont la chienne…
            Soeur de soupe est une expression pas très courante, mais que mes amis et moi utilisions quand on était jeunes. On avait pas mal de frères de soupe… 🍜
            Pour en revenir aux Français tu sais comme y peuvent être “frais chiés.” 🤣

            Liked by 1 person

          • J’essayais de ne pas sacrer (jurer) 😉
            Hah! C’est bin pour ça qu’les maudits frança ne comprennent pu rien! Y’on ‘a chienne c’est certain! 😉
            I like it. Faut que je m’en souvienne. soeur de soupe….
            Pis là tu viens d’m’apprendre kekchose. Ch’avais-pas comment épeler frais chier! LOL.
            Boy oy boy… c’pas facille écrire en joual…

            Liked by 1 person

          • Haha! J’ai lu tout ça dans un artic’ dans l’Express. Ce qui est bien c’est que le journaliste ne semblait pas trop d’accord sur la nécessité de traduire le Québecois…
            Je me rappelle quand Beau Dommage ou Charlebois ont commencé à être populaires en France, y’avait des mots pas clairs, mais on essayer de comprendre. La complainte du phoque en Alaska est géniale. Le phoque qui pleure passque sa “blonde” est partie…
            personnellement je pense que si un mot n’est pas “clair”, on met une note de bas de page et pis valà…
            Biz.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Suis d’accord. Pas besoin. Je me souviens lorsque j’ai lu le polar par Fred Vergas : Sous les vents de neptune. Avant de venir au Québec, le commissaire reçois des “cours” sur le langage québécois; genre on dit souvent “tu veux-tu quelque chose”? Depuis ce temps, je me rends compte que c’est trop vrai!.
            J’ai frustré que les Harry Potters ont été réimprimés pour les Amaricains en enlevant l’épellation British, genre colour vs color… Franchement. What a stupid thing.
            Anyway, on pourrait sûrement bitcher sur pleins de choses 😉

            Liked by 1 person

          • Sous les vents de neptune? Noté pour mes achats sur les quais de la Seine… (Chuis tout émotionné)
            Je préfère aussi l’orthographe Brit comme tu as pu le voir.
            Ouais, tu as raison. Arrêtons de bitcher.
            (Note en bas de page, “Bitcher”, expression Québécoise d’origine incertaine, peut-être influencée par l’Anglais “to bitch”, littéralement “chienner”, mais tous les auteurs ne sont pas d’accord, la signification approximative est “râler”) 😳

            Liked by 1 person

          • J’ai bien aimé. Ainsi que “Pars vite et reviens tard” (LOL émotionné!!!) No way in hell I am dropping my “U” in my spelling! 😉
            Bitcher – quelle perte de temps!
            xo

            Liked by 1 person

          • Pars vite et reviens tard… Bon titre. Traduction anglaise. Hit the road jack. (& don’t you come back no more…)
            Strange about the spelling. I would have thought in Canada you used the American spelling? Non?
            Et c’est vrai. Bitcher est une perte de temps. J’avoue tomber dans le piège trop souvent… Chais pas pourquoi… Ça doit être mon héritage “French”. 😉

            Liked by 1 person

          • Haha! Good traduction 😉 Bon livre…
            Non. Not me and not anything formal. I refuse to Americanise my spelling. I use s instead of z and add my u where necessary. Mais, il y en a plusieurs qui ont adopté l’amaricain.
            J’me pogne à bitcher et j’essaye de m’arrêter parce que tsé… mais j’avoue ne pas toujours réussir…

            Liked by 1 person

          • Pis tsé… je pense à autre chose… lorsque je lis un roman français ou même British, s’il y a une expression dont je ne connais pas le sens (ou me questionne (mais j’ai souvens raison)) – je fais une recherche sur notre ami Google.
            Y s’fendent le cul pour nous aider les internets 😉

            Liked by 1 person

  10. Q

    My God, he really looks like Captain Picard! He could have been a double, I mean a slam dunk double for the guy. I’m sure it would have been right up his alley from the way you describe him here.

    Beauty of a tribute.

    B

    Liked by 4 people

  11. Dear Dale,

    This is a wonderful tribute to your father. I would have liked to see him dance to “Do You Think I’m Sexy?” lolol

    Anyway, Happy Father’s Day Dale’s Dad! ⚡️💥

    Liked by 2 people

  12. I know Ally! Love her work and loved that last post of hers! Your dad’s art work is stunning. What a wonderful man, thanks for sharing him with us! Glad I came across your feed on the “discover” section of WordPress ❤️

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Pingback: For Dad on Father’s Day – JULISPECS REP's

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